After: Living the Resurrection

The Easter holiday is gone by, we celebrated it in a strange and different way this year. But still Jesus is risen and we shout hallelujah! But now that the day is over, and we are back to semi-normal lives, were does that leaves us? Now that we have celebrated the resurrection of Jesus, we have to decide what to do with it in our lives.

It was the same for Jesus’ followers as well. What would they do after the arrest, trial and crucifixion of Jesus? What would they do now with the news of the empty tomb spreading among them? They all had differing expectations of who Jesus was and how his life would play out with them in it. Even after Jesus told them what would happen, they did not expect this. Like us, they all had to decide what to do with the narrative of Easter.

I want to look specifically at Judas and Peter. Both were Jesus disciples, both betrayed him, yet Bothe responded on different ways. one of the things we learn from both Peter and Judas is this: Jesus knows we will let him down sometimes, He still brings us with Him.

Jesus knows we will let him down sometimes,

He still brings us with Him.

Let’s start with Judas.

Judas betrayal began long before his secret meeting with the Pharisees. Let me say this, I believe Judas loved Jesus. When he began following him, he believed in him, believed he was the Messiah, at least what Judas expected the Messiah to be.

When it was clear that Jesus did not come to establish an earthly kingdom, when Judas expectations were shattered, and he had no problem stealing from Jesus

And then when it became clear that Jesus wasn’t going to meet any of those expectations the relationship shifted – Judas had moved from loving Jesus, to try to benefit from him, to having no use for him at all. In the end he didn’t even make a demand for the payment he received, he simply asked ‘what will you give me?”

Judas betrayal shows us that even the closest followers of Jesus can fall over time.

Then there’s Peter.

Peter was the rock. He was outspoken, loyal and had a bit of a temper. The last one that we think would betray Jesu. “Even all fall way on account of you, I never will (Matt. 26:33)” He remain loyal even to the moment of Jesus arrest, cutting off a man’s ear when they came to arrest Jesus.

So when Jesus tells Peter that he would openly deny that he knew Jesus, not once, but three times, Peter was astonished. After all he was Peter, the rock.

Peter never intended to betray Jesus, but he let fear rule his heart in the moment. Peter doesn’t want to be arrested too, fear overpowers him and causes the rock to turn to sand.

Peter shows us that even the strongest of believers can waiver in fear and doubt, and fail.

Judas like Peter, walked with Jesus. Like Peter he saw the miracles, experienced the teachings and saw amazing things happen. Peter failed in the moment and denied Jesus. Judas failed in his walk with Jesus and betrayed him unto death.

We like it when the villain gets what he deserves, which is why we often don’t shed a tear when we read how Judas died. But by doing so, we miss an important chance to learn from his life.

Judas, like Peter, walked with Jesus. Like Peter he saw the miracles, and experienced the teachings. Peter failed in the moment and denied Jesus. Judas failed in his walk with Jesus and betrayed him unto death.

Both made mistakes, but Peter was restored, and Judas died a horrific death.

Peter never let his heart grow cold to Jesus. His denial was out of fear. Judas had let his heart harden towards Jesus, a betrayal driven by greed and bitterness.

When Judas betrays Jesus (Matt. 26:49), he greets him as Rabbi. Not Lord, not even Jesus, just rabbi. Judas had reduced Jesus to being a mere teacher, a good man.

But when we find Peter in the same moment he shouts “Lord, shall we strike with the sword? (Luke 22:49) and he does. He calls Jesus Lord in the moment of Judas’ betrayal, Jesus is still Lord to Peter.

And then we find Jesus and Peter, sitting on the shores of the Sea of Galilee (John 21:15). Jesus asks Peter if he loves him, and Peter responds “Lord, you know that I love you.” Jesus is still Lord to Peter.

We all have our own expectations of Jesus. Sometimes (oftentimes), they don’t match up with who he is, or what is best for us. We get frustrated, we doubt, we have fear.

If we let our doubts, frustrations, fears, and pursuit of earthly things cloud our judgment, we can begin to deny the reality of who Jesus is.

Each us need to choose what to do with the new of Jesus’ resurrection. Will we Jesus as just a good teacher and discount the glory of his resurrection. Or will we see Jesus as the glorified Christ, risen and ready to welcome you with open arms.

Jesus was still Lord to Peter, and Jesus is still Lord today.

 

 

 

Self-Care in the Time of Corona

This week is Masters Week. The week the golfing world descends on Augusta National Golf Club to witness the most captivating and beloved golf tournament of the year. Even if you don’t like golf, or watch golf, chances are you just might sneak a peek at a television broadcast this week. Magnolia Lane. The azaleas. Ray’s Creek. Amen Corner. Pimento cheese sandwiches. All the things that make The Masters experience what it is…the greatest week in golf.

But in 2020, amidst COVID-19, amidst stay at home orders…golf has been ruled non-essential. I’ve been home for three weeks now, working and trying to keep the walls from closing in on me. This week, honestly, is a kick in the gut. Masters week is a celebration in our home, we all partake. But this year, it’s a teardrop in the middle of an ocean of tears.

Five weeks ago, we lost our cat, Mags. Mags had been with me for going on 14 years. Than the social distancing order came. Than in the middle of The Players tournament (another Goedert household favorite), the announcement that The Masters would be postponed came. Than baseball opening day was gone. All these things are family favorites and traditions…gone. It started to feel like there was no time to recover from the body shots. Yesterday, was rough. A lot of shouting matches with the kid, irritability, and just feeling like an absolute failure at life, parenting, and ready to sleep through the rest of this pandemic.

As I was praying this morning, admittedly feeling sorry for myself, God directed me to the book of John. This is what I read:

John 10:10 NLT

“The thief’s purpose is to steal and kill and destroy. My purpose is to give life in all its fullness.”

Satan doesn’t just want to destroy us spiritually, but wants to take away the love we have for our everyday lives as well. Satan wants to take away joy, love, togetherness and make you feel alone and hopeless. We know this. I know this. But it is still easy to let everything in life, especially right now, drag you down and rob the light and hope from your life.

Self-care, or self-love right now means letting Jesus bring life into your life, even where things may seem dead, to let the fullness of who Jesus is to us, guide us to find ways to life life to our fullest. That means letting the creative spark God placed in you take new root and start new growth.

I have decided to make our home a fortress of hope and love. We will not let the darkness of the current state of the world dim our light. We will love, we will hug each other, we will laugh and make memories. We will remain strong in the love of God and the hope that Jesus has given us. As my son reminded me the other day, “Goederts don’t give up.” We will live life to it’s fullest.

It’s Masters week. Today, we will watch the Arnie documentary on Golf Channel while enjoying some of his signature tea and lemonade. Tomorrow, we will watch The Greatest Game Ever Played, one of my favorite golf movies. Wednesday, we will play Tiger Woods Golf: The Masters and have a par 3 tournament, Thursday – Sunday, my son and and I will start a four round video game version of The Masters. Sunday, we will watch last years final round, enjoying pimento cheese sandwiches, chips and Azaeleas.

Make the decision for yourself, for your family, that we will all take time for the life-giving things that we can still do. Breath love, hope into your home, your children, and your spouse.

We have but two choices: we can allow the overwhelming state of the world invade our hearts and homes, or we can choose to infuse our lives, and those around us with hope, love and life.

Don’t let the thief steal your joy, kill your hope, and destroy your love. Instead, let Jesus give life to your joy, and make full your hope and love.

This week will be one of life and smiles, after all, it’s Masters week.